College Forward & Natural Texas @ Shoal Creek – Thanks

AustinParksFoundation Parks, Volunteer 1 Comment

A big thank you to College Forward and their wonderful 50 plus volunteers who worked with the Austin Parks Foundation and Carl Brockman and his team from Natural Texas – who provided arborists with chainsaws, a big chipper and the wonderful forestry mower.

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Waiting to feed more cut ligustrum to the chipper

Waiting to feed more cut ligustrum to the chipper

We worked on removing a large population of ligustrum, a evergreen multi-trunked tree from Asia that has taken over big portions of our greenbelts. Volunteers cut and hauled over 1,000 trunks and limbs to a chipper where Natural Texas arborists turned them into mulch, as well as cutting down a big row of ligustrums along the road on parkland.  We’re workign to remove the remaining trees grind them up into mulch on site this week.

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The Forestry Mower tackles a dead tree.

The Forestry Mower tackles a dead tree.

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Comments 1

  1. Thank you thank you thank you to the amazing folks who did this terrific work! The more invasive plants removed, the more native creatures and plants will thrive. I hope this refreshing change in the greenbelt flora will help educate neighbors, who might now be more motivated to remove destructive invasives from their own yards. I can’t wait to see more songbirds, wafer ash, Turk’s cap, agarita, twisted leaf yucca and other wonderful things that used to be crowded out by ligustrum, nandina, bamboo, etc. Keep up the great work!!

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